Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Quilting Modern



Each quilter has a unique style and preferred quilt genre. Quilts are a canvass for a multitude of artistic  stitching endeavors. Although I have never seen a quilt I did not like, I've found that as I have matured in quilt experience, my tastes have developed and I am able to identify which genres please me most. I am very partial to the quilt style and handwork of Lucy at Quilting with the Past. She is gifted in a style that is authentic and comforting. Her miniature quilts are a special treat to view!

Additionally, I find the quilts made by Bonnie Hunter who blogs at Quiltville  to be creative and interesting. Bonnie's effervescent personality and personable, hand's-on style of marketing through social media just draw you in. My friend, Karleen, and I both enjoy Bonnie and frequently will text one another when a QuiltCam alert is given. Bonnie streams live video of sewing sessions in her basement sewing room. Bonnie's famous for her scrappy quilts and her traditional style.

Thus, it surprised me recently how drawn into the quilt style presented by the National Featured Quilter at our local quilt show. Katie Pederson, who specializes in modern quilting style, was the featured artist and a large selection of her quilts were on display. Additionally, she was there to chat with attendees, to sign books, and to answer questions. Friendly and sincere, she is a very talented artist and gifted quilter.

 
This quilt is a beautiful example of improvisational technique and contemporary graphics.

 
Katie, busy signing my book! She says to "break free, go bold".
She co-authored this book with Jacquie Gering.



Fabric, scraps, yardage, cottons, pieces.
Whatever you call them, they create the nerve center for
modern quilting and beyond.
They are the mecca for all quilters!
I love this scramble on Katie's ironing board.

Here are just a few examples of some of the beautiful improvisational quilts that Quilting Modern shares techniques for. In the book, seven core techniques are presented with detailed instructions. That's good, because creating quilts in this method requires that you think outside of the box!


Isn't this a beauty? I love how the colors were used to create such a strong, geometric design. And I suppose I am drawn to it because it not only represents a modern style of quilting, but it draws upon my traditional comfort zone when it comes to quilt design.


The sewing station. It looks like no one is there because
Katie did a marvelous job of walking around and visiting with attendees.



 Karleen and I noted that many of the Quilting Modern quilts used large spaces of blank nothingness. Each of these areas was machine quilted with modern, beautiful lines, geometrics, or circles. The actual quilting process is an integral part of this method. We also noted that the fabric used for the expanses of what we called blank nothingness was beautifully textured and inviting. We asked about the use of this fabric and Katie shared that it is a special linen/cotton blend by Robert Kaufman Fabrics called Essex. It had gorgeous visual and hand appeal.


Here's another vibrant, geometric, free-form quilt.


Katie Pedersen and Jacquie Gering give workshops on their technique. There is one coming up on May 20 - 22, 2013 at Island Quilter on Vashon Island, Washington.

Katie also blogs at Sew Katie Did. She says thread is the best glue! And I say her words aptly describe the process of the joining of pieces with threads.


Karleen and I really enjoyed visiting with Katie and learning more about improvisational quilting.

~

"We wrote this book to share our designs for quilts with modern aesthetic and our enthusiasm for improvisational quilting techniques. Improvisation has various interpretations, but for us it means creating in the moment and reacting to ideas and our environment to make something new. Improvisation energizes our creativity and fosters an inventive spirit."

~ Jacque and Katie ~



Click to enlarge.



3 comments:

  1. It's not a quilt anymore; it's art. Would they be used in functional ways as well?

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  2. Functional for sure! I pulled them from around the house right before I came including the floor and couch. Thanks for this wonderful post! I had an awesome time at the show. xo

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  3. I think my last comment might not have gone through. Thanks so much for this wonderful post! I had a great time!

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